Faq

FAQS

How effective is Reverse Osmosis filtration compared to other methods?

Reverse osmosis, also known as hyper filtration, is the finest means of filtration available today. RO is the most convenient and effective method of water filtration. Reverse Osmosis refers to the process of forcing water through a semi-permeable membrane under pressure, which is rated at 0.0001 micron (equals to 0.00000004 inch!) this is the technology used to make bottled water. Non RO water filters are much less effective, and the pore size on these filter media are much bigger. They can filter out coarse particles, sediments and elements only up to their micron rating. Anything finer and most dissolved substances cannot be filtered out. As a result, water is far less clean and less safer compared to Reverse Osmosis filtration.

Reverse Osmosis uses a membrane that is semi-permeable, allowing water to pass through it, while rejecting the contaminants that are too large to pass through the tiny pores in the membrane. Reverse Osmosis, or RO is the opposite of the natural process by which moisture is taken up by living cell. Root cells of plants, for example, have special cell walls the allow water to pass through them. In Reverse Osmosis, water is forced against a membrane that is semi-permeable, allowing water to pass through it, while rejecting the contaminants that are too large to pass through the tiny pores in the membrane. Impurities are left behind and are rinsed away to a waste drain.
Water which begins its natural cycle as rain, comes into contact with many sources of contamination before eventually finding its way to your tap. The various minerals (including heavy metal ions) and salts that have been dissolved by the water during this cycle are called Total Dissolved Solids (TDS). TDS meter measures the PPM (parts per million) value of inorganic dissolved substances in the water.